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Lesson 7 | Do you?

Here’s Claire. She’s gunna run the 10K.

Do you wanna run the 10K?

Now listen to this simple question. I’m going to say it four times. Each time I’m going to say it slightly faster. Listen for the changes I make.

Do you want to run the 10K?

Do ya wanna run the 10K?

Dya wanna run the 10K?

Ya wanna run the 10K?

First, I spoke slowly and clearly as anyone would in a formal situation.

Do you want to run the 10K?

Then I spoke a little quicker, using “ya” and “wanna.”

Do ya wanna run the 10K?

The next time I asked it, I made a small change, instead of saying Do ya, I said “Dya.”

Dya

Dya wanna run the 10K?

And last, in a very informal way, I just dropped the question word “do” entirely.

Ya wanna run the 10K?

In this lesson you'll make these changes to simple questions that use “do.”

Listen

Do ya like ta run?

Dya like ta run?

Ya like ta run?

Read

Do ya like ta run?

Dya like ta run?

Ya like ta run?

play video

Exercise 1

play video

For practice, read these sentences slowly.

Do ya wanna have an orange?

Do ya wanna have some orange juice?

Do ya wanna have some milk?

Do ya wanna have some tea?

Do ya wanna have a nap?

Dya wanna have an orange?

Dya wanna have some orange juice?

Dya wanna have some milk?

Dya wanna have some tea?

Dya wanna have a nap?

Repeat (reading)

Now read these quickly.

Do ya wanna have an orange?

Do ya wanna have some orange juice?

Do ya wanna have some milk?

Do ya wanna have some tea?

Do ya wanna have a nap?

Dya wanna have an orange?

Dya wanna have some orange juice?

Dya wanna have some milk?

Dya wanna have some tea?

Dya wanna have a nap?

Exercise 2

play video

When you speak slowly and clearly, you say “Do you.” When you speak in normal conversation, you often say “Do ya” and “Dya.”

Listen and repeat these questions for practice.

Do ya see her?

Do ya see her number?

Do ya see her now?

Do ya see her at the starting line?

Do ya see her coming?

Repeat (listening)

Now repeat these sentences quickly using “Dya.”

Dya see her?

Dya see her number?

Dya see her now?

Dya see her at the starting line?

Dya see her coming?

Exercise 3

play video

Now, for practice, listen and repeat these questions using to the very short informal form “ya.”

Ya see her?

Ya see her number?

Ya see her at the start?

Ya see her comun?

Read

Now you try it, change these questions using “Ya.”

Do you want to eat dinner?

Do you want to see a movie?

Do you want to go home?

Do you have to stay late?

Do you want to eat something?

Exercise 4

play video

Now, you change these questions using “Do ya” or “Dya.”

Say them slowly.

Do you need something?

Do you want to stay here?

Do you have to get up early?

Do you have a car?

Do you think he’s coming?

Repeat (listening)

Now listen to these questions and say them quickly using “Dya.” Then say them again using just “Ya.”

For example:

Dya have any money? Ya have any money?

Now you try it.

Dya need somethun?

Dya want to stay here?

Dya have to get up early?

Dya have a car?

Dya think he’s comun?

Exercise 5

play video

Okay, say these questions four ways, with “Do you,” then “Do ya,” then “Dya,” and finally with “Ya.” Like this:

Do you want to have lunch?

Do ya wanna have lunch?

Dya wanna have lunch?

Ya wanna have lunch?

Do you want to walk to school? Do ya? Dya? Ya?

Do you have to get up early?

Do you want to go to the movies?

Do you need to get gas?

Do you have to work tomorrow?

Exercise 6

play video

Let’s look at two small changes like this. When I ask a question like:

Does he like to run?


I often shorten it to sound like this:

Dzi like ta run?

I say, Dzi. Dzi. Dzi like ta run?

And when I ask,

Does she like to run?

I often shorten it to sound like this,

Dshi like ta run?

Dshi. Dshi. Dshi like ta run?

Listen

Dzi like ta run?

Dzshi like ta run?

Read

Dzi like ta run?

Dzshi like ta run?

Exercise 7

play video

For practice read these sentences and change them to say them quickly.

Does he have a car?

Does he need money?

Does he read much?

Does he like music?

Does she dance well?

Does she go to school?

Does she have a job?

Does she like me?

Comment

play video

A common way to ask politely about something is to ask
“Don’t you?”

For example, if I’m not sure you like pop music, I might say

Don’t you like pop music?

And if I say it a little faster, I say

Don’t ya like pop music? Don’t ya?

But, if I say it really quickly, I would change it to say

“Dontcha”

Dontcha like pop music?

Listen

Dontcha like old movies?
Dontcha have any money?
Dontcha have a job?
Dontcha need more money?
Dontcha have a car?


Repeat these questions using Dontcha:

Dontcha like old movies?
Dontcha have any money?
Dontcha have a job?
Dontcha need more money?
Dontcha have a car?

Some people pronounce Dontcha slightly differently.
They say “Dontchew.”


Dontchew like pop music?

You can say Dontcha or Dontchew, it makes no difference.

For practice, ask these questions using Dontchew.

Don’t you like my hat?
Don’t you like old movies?
Don’t you have any money?
Don’t you speak English?
Don’t you want to dance?

Final Conversation

play video

Listen to this conversation for the changes that you’ve learned.

Hi. Dya wanna come over?

Sure, ya havun a party?

No, just a couple a friends.

Dya want me ta bring you some pizza?

Dya think ya could? That’d be great!

Go to Lesson 8 ▶